My Bookshelf

These are my memorable reads of late. What are yours?

1.  Give & Take (Adam Grant): This gem was on my bucket list for a long time. I enjoyed every bit of this book while recuperating from minor foot surgery in the summer. In today’s transactional, quid pro quo world, we can learn much from Grant about authentic giving as a pathway to personal enrichment.

This gem was on my bucket list for a long time. I enjoyed every bit of this book while recuperating from minor foot surgery in the summer. In today’s transactional, quid pro quo world, we can learn much from Grant about authentic giving as a pathway to personal enrichment.

2 .  Factfulness (Hans Rosling): I was first introduced to Rosling’s work through this YouTube video while I was doing pricing analysis for my services portfolio. I was researching how others analyze data for big-picture takeaways and how to develop engaging visualizations to get my points across most effectively. Rosling’s book, like his TED talks, demonstrates – through evidence-based reasoning – how much there is to celebrate about our world and humanity at large. What a refreshing change from the 24-hour negative news cycle!

3. The Business Case for Curiosity (Francesca Gino on HBR): I loved this piece which explains the importance of nourishing a knowledge culture in any organization. It reminded me how I can have a lasting impact on my organization by driving a knowledge culture and how the individuals I hire can also have a similar positive effect on the team.

Here are two others in the pack worth checking out:

4 .  Nurture by Nature (Paul D. Tieger and Barbara Barron-Tieger): A all-round great book for parents! If you thought understanding MBTI helped you be more effective at work, give this book a try. And if you are like me, wondering how your two kids are so different, you’ll enjoy learning how to nurture them based on their unique personalities. Thanks to @Pam_Fox_Rollin for the recommendation!

5 . Better Brainstorming (HBR article by Hal Gregersen): An out-of-the-box approach on how to think out of the box… it was harder than it looked!




6.  The TED talk that left me in awe: No words can express the feelings this talk left me with… enough said!


7. The book I read with my 12-year old daughter… I am Malala (Malala Yousafzai): We have all heard of Malala’s struggles, heroism, and ultimate triumph. But not many of us know the details behind her story, her everyday struggles, and what terrorism does to children in parts of the world like hers. I‘m thankful to Malala for sharing her story so my daughters can be inspired by her courage and appreciate the many freedoms we take for granted daily.

8.  Red Teaming (Bryce Hoffman): A must-read for anyone who manages large, complex projects or develops strategic plans. In today’s VUCA world (thanks to @Whitney_Hischier for adding this to my vocabulary). Hoffman educates us on the importance of carefully considering all potential scenarios, all perspectives, and all things that can possibly go wrong. How can we take our good plans and make them great…or take our great plans and make them even better. When the stakes are high, you’ll want to “red team” your plan, trust me! Enjoy learning all about Red Teaming tools and how to red team your own plans with this great book.

9. The book I read a second time… Great by Choice (Jim Collins, the author of Good to Great): This was one I read for the first time a few years ago. Each of my product portfolio leaders received a copy from me in 2016. I decided to read it again this year because it is a book that makes one think. How can we maximize investment leverage? How can we execute on the discipline principles (20-mile march)? How do successful companies incubate to drive a healthily humming culture of innovation (fire bullets, then cannonballs)? Perhaps you will also read it twice!

10.  And lastly, one I finished reading recently… Industries of the Future (Alec Ross): It is both a quick read and a key-off point for what to learn about industries which are changing our lives and our way of living. Think robotics, bitcoin, genetics, cyber security, big data, and their ilk. Ross did an amazing job of explaining these trends with relevant facts in an approachable manner for all of us.

What should I add to my reading list? Please leave your recommendations by commenting on this post.

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